?

Log in

geek_dragon

Finding the truth is a lot of work.

Finding the truth is a lot of work.

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
keyword-99
Doing research from home in a boony town without access to academic journals  is hard.
I'm probably doing it wrong.
In university I could go to the library, or even search for journal articles from home.
I also worked with non-people studies... you could just buy the stuff and mix it up... and see reality through direct experiment.
You can't really do direct experiments with rape, so one has to resort to other research methods.
  • I don't remember the name of the sites - but there's professional academic online journal archives of publications of all kinds. It's paid access though - so I haven't looked beyond that.
    The college library may be able to help too.
    • I have JSTOR access through the middle of next month if you have article names or authors you're looking for.
      • sweet! I might take you up on it.
        I'm getting sick of researching rape though... it's not fun.
  • Google Scholar is an excellent way of finding free articles. I was able to build an entire course on health economics using this for about 80% of the copious articles I assigned.

    Most medical journals give away their articles (except perhaps the most recent). I'm particularly fond of the British Medical Journal. They should have lots of information related to your topic.

    Google Scholar also picks up journal articles hosted quasi-legally on the article author's own web site. (Whether it's legal is disputable, but it IS ethical, which is why everyone turns a blind eye to this common practice.)

    If you add 'working paper' to the search for your topic, you'll also get papers-in-progress.
  • (no subject) - zetaperspective
    • You are so funny. Your idea of evidence for your opnions are slice and TresSugar, and other shallow fluff websites. But for evidence that you will consider from people with opinions other than your own, you demand court documents, and police files, and scientific studies, then you come up with the lamest reasons for dismissing the evidence.
      • (Anonymous)
        Not all claims demand equal evidence; the more specific or serious the claim, the more specific or serious the evidence needs to be. "Men are generally expected to pay for dates" is both very general and very mundane, in fact it's basically common knowledge, so it would be very strange to see a scientific study on the phenomenon. If you seriously dispute the idea that men are generally expected to pay for dates, then why don't you just state the type and quantity of evidence that would be needed to convince you?

        "The police generally laugh off claims of rape" is about equally general but is MUCH more serious, as it is asserting pervasive malfeasance and violation of procedure on the part of the police, rather than simple gender proclivities. I told you what kind of evidence I would need to see to back up that claim, and you only managed to deliver one piece, and even that one was compromised somewhat by the fact that it mentioned absolutely no attempt to get the officers' side of the story.

        If Dr. Lisak claims, with no independent verification, that he asked students certain questions and X% answered yes, then I have to be able to trust his word. Do you seriously think that the fact that Dr. Lisak makes an income from giving rape lectures is a lame reason for demanding independent verification of his claims?
Powered by LiveJournal.com