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Annoying word of the day.

Annoying word of the day.

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keyword-99
My computational quantum chemistry text seems to be written by an english buff:

Moiety \Moi"e*ty\ (moi"[-e]*t[y^]), n.; pl. Moieties
(moi"[-e]*t[i^]z). [F. moiti['e], L. medietas, fr. medius
middle, half. See Mid, a., and cf. Mediate, Mediety.]
1. One of two equal parts; a half; as, a moiety of an estate,
of goods, or of profits; the moiety of a jury, or of a
nation. --Shak.
[1913 Webster]

The more beautiful moiety of his majesty's subject.
--Addison.
[1913 Webster]

2. An indefinite part; a small part. --Shak.
[1913 Webster]

It's funny though, the two contrasting definitions make the word a little useless. A half and an indefinitely small part are two very different things. Half is large, equal, definite. Indefinite smacks of atomic or ripped off.
  • (no subject) - haunted_lady
  • Re: Your conclusion

    Yeah, but it's sloppy. Specific words can convey things more precisely. Uh, think of it as better resolution on the feeling, like painting in more detail. Sometimes vague is poetic, but sometimes it's better to understand what the person really thinks. (Especially in bridges)
    Today at lunch my dad was trying to tell us about this door, and we ended up arguing what the words meant, b/c we each thought the words were opposite to what the other thought.
    Also, cringe, if you've seen pagan, or non-fluffy-pagan, and seen the bitter hate filled arguements over the meaning of a word... sigh.

    i should find the phrase where the word was used, it was actually used in such a way that became ridiculous, which defeats the point of making us run to the dictionary to make sure we understand the sentance LOL.


    Something about setting parameters to cancel out the effects of larger moieties.
  • Re: Your conclusion

    Goes back to hug you. I hope my last comment doesn't come off as snarky.
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